Our Recommendations

  • Klara and the Sun

    Klara and the Sun: A novel Cover Image
    $28.00
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    March 2021 Indie Next List


    Klara and the Sun from Nobel-winner Kazuo Ishiguro is a radiant new novel about the bond between Klara, an Artificial Friend, and Josie, her human companion. The setting, a dystopian realm of genetic editing and stark class divisions, is not surprising given the author’s previous work, yet Ishiguro’s immense, unwavering portrayal of kindness is astonishing and revitalizing. Classic Ishiguro themes of loyalty, friendship, and sacrifice weave through the novel, but the thread of love runs deep, giving the book warmth and hope so that the earned twist feels more like a dawn than a sunset. Whether you’re returning to Ishiguro or discovering his voice for the first time, I’m excited for you. This is a chance to bask in the brilliance of one the greatest writers of our time.”
    — Caroline McGregor, Books & Books, Coral Gables, FL

    Description


    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
    A GOOD MORNING AMERICA Book Club Pick!

    Klara and the Sun is a magnificent new novel from the Nobel laureate Kazuo Ishiguro—author of Never Let Me Go and the Booker Prize-winning The Remains of the Day.


    Klara and the Sun, the first novel by Kazuo Ishiguro since he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, tells the story of Klara, an Artificial Friend with outstanding observational qualities, who, from her place in the store, watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass on the street outside. She remains hopeful that a customer will soon choose her.

    Klara and the Sun is a thrilling book that offers a look at our changing world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator, and one that explores the fundamental question: what does it mean to love?

    In its award citation in 2017, the Nobel committee described Ishiguro's books as "novels of great emotional force" and said he has "uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world."

    About the Author


    KAZUO ISHIGURO was born in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1954 and moved to Britain at the age of five. His eight previous works of fiction have earned him many honors around the world, including the Nobel Prize in Literature and the Booker Prize. His work has been translated into over fifty languages, and The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, both made into acclaimed films, have each sold more than 2 million copies. He was given a knighthood in 2018 for Services to Literature. He also holds the decorations of Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres from France and the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star from Japan.

    Praise For…


    One of the most affecting and profound novels Ishiguro has written….I'll go for broke and call Klara and the Sun a masterpiece that will make you think about life, mortality, the saving grace of love: in short, the all of it.”
    Maureen Corrigan, NPR
     
    “A delicate, haunting story, steeped in sorrow and hope”
    —Ron Charles, The Washington Post
     
    “It aspires to enchantment, or to put it another way, reenchantment, the restoration of magic to a disenchanted world. Ishiguro drapes realism like a thin cloth over a primordial cosmos. Every so often, the cloth slips, revealing the old gods, the terrible beasts, the warring forces of light and darkness.”
    —Judith Shulevitz, The Atlantic
     
    “Ishiguro’s prose is soft and quiet. It feels like the perfect book to curl up with on a Sunday afternoon. He allows the story to unfold slowly and organically, revealing enough on every page to continue piquing the reader’s curiosity. The novel is an intriguing take on how artificial intelligence might play a role in our futures...a poignant meditation on love and loneliness”
    Maggie Sprayregen, The Associated Press

    “For four decades now, Ishiguro has written eloquently about the balancing act of remembering without succumbing irrevocably to the past. Memory and the accounting of memory, its burdens and its reconciliation, have been his subjects… Klara and the Sun complements [Ishiguro’s] brilliant vision…There’s no narrative instinct more essential, or more human.”
    The New York Times Book Review

     “A prayer is a postcard asking for a favor, sent upward. Whether our postcards are read by anyone has become the searching doubt of Ishiguro’s recent novels, in which this master, so utterly unlike his peers, goes about creating his ordinary, strange, godless allegories.”
    James Wood, The New Yorker
     
    “One of the joys of Ishiguro's novels is the way they recall and reframe each other, almost like the same stories told in different formats...Again and again, Ishiguro asks: What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to have a self? And how much of that self can and should we give to others?”
    —NPR


    “Moving and beautiful… an unequivocal return to form, a meditation in the subtlest shades on the subject of whether our species will be able to live with everything it has created… [A] feverish read, [a] one-sitter…  Few writers who’ve ever lived have been able to create moods of transience, loss and existential self-doubt as Ishiguro has — not art about the feelings, but the feelings themselves.”
    The Los Angeles Times

    “As with Ishiguro’s other works, the rich inner reflections of his protagonists offer big takeaways, and Klara’s quiet but astute observations of human nature land with profound gravity . . . This dazzling genre-bending work is a delight.”
    Publishers Weekly [starred review]

    “A haunting fable of a lonely, moribund world that is entirely too plausible.”
    Kirkus Reviews [starred review]

    Praise from the UK:

    “There is something so steady and beautiful about the way Klara is always approaching connection, like a Zeno’s arrow of the heart. People will absolutely love this book, in part because it enacts the way we learn how to love. Klara and the Sun is wise like a child who decides, just for a little while, to love their doll. “What can children know about genuine love?” Klara asks. The answer, of course, is everything.”
    —Anne Enright, The Guardian
     
    “Flawless . . . This is a novel for fans of Never Let Me Go, with which it shares a DNA of emotional openness, the quality of letting us see ourselves from the outside, and a vision of humanity which — while not exactly optimistic — is tender, touching and true.”
    —John Self, The Times
     
    “With its hushed intensity of emotion, this fable about robot love and loneliness confirms Ishiguro as a master prose stylist.”
    —Ian Thomson, The Evening Standard
     
    “It is innocence that forms Ishiguro’s major subject, explored in novels at once familiar and strange, which only gradually display their true and devastating significance.”
    —Jon Day, The Financial Times
     
    “The novel is a masterpiece of great beauty, meticulous control and, as ever, clear, simple prose.”
    —Bryan Appleyard, The Sunday Times

    “A deft dystopian fable about the innocence of a robot that asks big questions about existence”
    --The Financial Times
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780593318171
    ISBN-10: 059331817X
    Publisher: Knopf
    Publication Date: March 2nd, 2021
    Pages: 320
    Language: English
  • Justice, Justice, Thou Shalt Pursue

    Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue: A Life's Work Fighting for a More Perfect Union (Law in the Public Square #2) Cover Image
    $26.95
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    Description


    Ruth Bader Ginsburg's last book is a curation of her own legacy, tracing the long history of her work for gender equality and a “more perfect Union.”

    In the fall of 2019, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the University of California, Berkeley School of Law to deliver the first annual Herma Hill Kay Memorial Lecture in honor of her friend, the late Herma Hill Kay, with whom Ginsburg had coauthored the very first casebook on sex-based discrimination in 1974. Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue is the result of a period of collaboration between Ginsburg and Amanda L. Tyler, a Berkeley Law professor and former Ginsburg law clerk. During Justice Ginsburg's visit to Berkeley, she told her life story in conversation with Tyler. In this collection, the two bring together that conversation and other materials—many previously unpublished—that share details from Justice Ginsburg's family life and long career. These include notable briefs and oral arguments, some of Ginsburg's last speeches, and her favorite opinions that she wrote as a Supreme Court Justice (many in dissent), along with the statements that she read from the bench in those important cases. Each document was chosen by Ginsburg and Tyler to tell the story of the litigation strategy and optimistic vision that were at the heart of Ginsburg's unwavering commitment to the achievement of "a more perfect Union."
     
    In a decades-long career, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an advocate and jurist for gender equality and for ensuring that the United States Constitution leaves no person behind. Her work transformed not just the American legal landscape, but American society more generally. Ginsburg labored tirelessly to promote a Constitution that is ever more inclusive and that allows every individual to achieve their full human potential. As revealed in these pages, in the area of gender rights, Ginsburg dismantled long-entrenched systems of discrimination based on outdated stereotypes by showing how such laws hold back both genders. And as also shown in the materials brought together here, Justice Ginsburg had a special ability to appreciate how the decisions of the high court impact the lived experiences of everyday Americans. The passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in September 2020 as this book was heading into production was met with a public outpouring of grief. With her death, the country lost a hero and national treasure whose incredible life and legacy made the United States a more just society and one in which “We the People,” for whom the Constitution is written, includes everyone.

    About the Author


    Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933–2020) was Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Born in Brooklyn, New York, she received her BA from Cornell University, attended Harvard Law School, and received her LLB from Columbia Law School. From 1959 to 1961, Ginsburg served as a law clerk to the Honorable Edmund L. Palmieri, Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. She was a professor of law at Rutgers University School of Law (1963–1972) and at Columbia Law School (1972–1980). She was appointed a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1980. Then-president Clinton nominated her as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and she took her seat on August 10, 1993. Justice Ginsburg died on September 18, 2020, as this book was going into production.

    Amanda L. Tyler is Shannon Cecil Turner Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches and writes about the Supreme Court, the federal courts, constitutional law, and civil procedure. The author of many articles and several books, including Habeas Corpus in Wartime: From the Tower of London to Guantanamo Bay, Tyler also serves as a coeditor of the prominent casebook and treatise Hart and Wechsler’s The Federal Courts and the Federal System. Tyler served as a law clerk to the Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court of the United States during the October Term 1999.

    Praise For…


    "Even if you've read Ginsburg's memoir or seen the biopic On the Basis of Sex, this book will offer new insight into her storied career—and its lingering impact on the American legal system. . . . As Ginsburg said, 'Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.' We'll be joining her, once again, in the pages of this book."
    — O, The Oprah Magazine

    "Anyone needing more reasons to admire Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020) will find them in this inspiring collection of speeches (all previously unpublished), briefs, oral arguments, dissenting opinions, and a candid conversation with Tyler, a professor at the Berkeley School of Law who served as Ginsburg’s law clerk during the 1999 term. . . . An informative perspective on a tireless advocate for fairness and equity."
    — Kirkus Reviews
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780520381926
    ISBN-10: 0520381920
    Publisher: University of California Press
    Publication Date: March 16th, 2021
    Pages: 288
    Language: English
    Series: Law in the Public Square
  • Recollections of My Nonexistence

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    Recollections of My Nonexistence: A Memoir Cover Image
    $16.00
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    Staff Reviews


     

     

    — From Recollections of My Nonexistence

    March 2020 Indie Next List


    “Over Rebecca Solnit’s 30 years of writing, readers like me have fallen in love with her seismic, world-shifting essays, and I was not disappointed by this memoir, her first longform writing in seven years. True to her form, this is a memoir not necessarily of the events of Solnit’s coming of age, but rather the greater influences in her development as a feminist, an activist, and a writer in 1980’s San Francisco. In these pages, Solnit describes the formation of her own powerful voice while interrogating the culture that routinely silences women through violence and disregard. By sharing these formative years, Solnit is sure to inspire and vindicate generations of women of all ages and offer much-needed encouragement to people of all genders to invest in voices long suppressed.”
    — Megan Bell, Underground Books, Carrollton, GA

    Description


    An electric portrait of the artist as a young woman that asks how a writer finds her voice in a society that prefers women to be silent

    In Recollections of My Nonexistence, Rebecca Solnit describes her formation as a writer and as a feminist in 1980s San Francisco, in an atmosphere of gender violence on the street and throughout society and the exclusion of women from cultural arenas. She tells of being poor, hopeful, and adrift in the city that became her great teacher, and of the small apartment that, when she was nineteen, became the home in which she transformed herself. She explores the forces that liberated her as a person and as a writer--books themselves; the gay community that presented a new model of what else gender, family, and joy could mean; and her eventual arrival in the spacious landscapes and overlooked conflicts of the American West.

    Beyond being a memoir, Solnit's book is also a passionate argument: that women are not just impacted by personal experience, but by membership in a society where violence against women pervades. Looking back, she describes how she came to recognize that her own experiences of harassment and menace were inseparable from the systemic problem of who has a voice, or rather who is heard and respected and who is silenced--and how she was galvanized to use her own voice for change.

    About the Author


    Rebecca Solnit is the author of more than twenty books, including A Field Guide to Getting Lost, The Faraway Nearby, AParadise Built in Hell, River of Shadows, and Wanderlust. She is also the author of Men Explain Things to Me and many essays on feminism, activism and social change, hope, and the climate crisis. A product of the California public education system from kindergarten to graduate school, she is a regular contributor to The Guardian and other publications.

    Praise For…


    Praise for Recollections of My Nonexistence:

    “Much more than a feminist manifesto . . . Solnit movingly describes her efforts to fashion ‘the self who will speak’ . . . There are phrases, such as ‘women’s stories,’ ‘silencing,’ or ‘gaslighting,’ that contemporary discourse has emptied out. Solnit revives these terms with the breath of their own histories.” —Katy Waldman, The New Yorker 

    "At the same time that [Solnit] describes her forays into her past, she invites us to connect pieces of her story to our own, as a measure of how far we've come and how far we have left to go." —Jenny Odell, The New York Times Book Review 

    “Throughout her rich body of work, essayist and critic Rebecca Solnit has revealed pieces of herself in writings about the beauty of getting lost, the joys of walking both for pleasure and with purpose, and perhaps most famously, the indignity of being mansplained to. At last, she uses her eagle eye to explore her own life. Recollections of My Nonexistence is a marvel: a memoir that details her awakening as a feminist, an environmentalist, and a citizen of the world. Every single sentence is exquisite.” —Maris Kreizman, Vulture

    “[A] splendid memoir of longings and determinations, of resistances and revolutions, personal and political, illuminating the kiln in which one of the boldest, most original minds of our time was annealed.” —Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

    “A clarion call of a memoir, chronicling, in unfettered, poetic prose, her coming-of-age . . . and her emergence as one of our most potent cultural critics.” O, The Oprah Magazine

    “A resonant and moving portrait of how challenging life can be in the female body.” —Time, “100 Must-Read Books of 2020”

    “A deeply intimate and deeply internal book about how Solnit became one of the defining feminist thinkers of the twenty-first century [and] a nostalgic love letter to the San Francisco of her youth . . . Solnit writes beautifully and with much compassionate nuance about how the threat of violence and not just its execution colors all parts of a woman’s life, and how actual physical violence is just one of myriad ways that women are controlled, subjugated and silenced . . . This [book] is electrifying in its precision of thought and language.”San Francisco Chronicle

    “Solnit has valiantly been making the case that misogynist speech and violence are on a spectrum for decades, long before mainstream acceptance of the idea . . . In Recollections of My Nonexistence, Solnit implies that just as the illness can be both dramatic and also cumulative, gradual, and imperceptible, so might be the cure. And things that feel insufficient — writing, talking, walking, teaching — do in fact represent tiny counterweights, which together shift the course of culture.” —NPR.org

    “For Solnit fans, her new memoir is a glimpse of all that was ‘taking form out of sight,’ providing a key to understanding much of her work to date. Yet simply as a coming-of-age narrative, it also has much to offer someone new to her writing. [Recollections] often reverses the figure-ground relationship, portraying the emergence of a writer and her voice from a particular cultural moment and set of fortuitous influences . . . [It] often reads as a letter to young activists and women writers—less ‘back in my day’ and more ‘I fought, and am fighting, the same battles you are.’” —Jenny Odell, The New York Times Book Review

    “Solnit begins this book of personal and cultural explorations with the memory of looking in a mirror and seeing herself disappear. It’s a fitting metaphor for a narrative that is as much a social history as it is a memoir, engaging questions of invisibility and silence and the way patriarchal forces seek to render women small.” Los Angeles Times

    “Solnit emphasizes the need to find poetry in survival . . . [Recollections of My Nonexistence is] a voice raised in hope against gender violence. It’s a call we should listen to.” The Washington Post

    “It is a rare writer who has both the intellectual heft and the authority of frontline experience to tackle the most urgent issues of our time. One of the reasons [Solnit] has won so many admirers is the sense that she is driven not by anger but by compassion and the desire to offer encouragement . . . That voice of hope is more essential now than ever, and this memoir is a valuable glimpse into the grit and courage that enabled her to keep telling sidelined stories.”The Guardian (London)

    “A brilliant memoir that is at once both of the moment and timeless . . . Recollections of My Nonexistence is all about liberation. And it invites us to think more broadly about what is possible in challenging times.” —John Nichols, The Progressive

    “[A] feat of exacting labor, with places from decades ago remembered in their tiny details alongside a constant, simmering anger at how those same places were ordinary war zones for women.” Vanity Fair

    “A work of feminist solidarity, in which [Solnit] chooses to write not from herself alone, but ‘for and about and often with the voices of other women talking about survival’ . . . What Solnit wants most is to talk about the obstacles her younger self found . . . She’s concerned with the way women disappear, or are encouraged to abdicate their bodies and their vocation . . . [A] meditation on creativity, home, and an elusive self.” —4Columns

    “[A] splendid memoir of longings and determinations, of resistances and revolutions, personal and political, illuminating the kiln in which one of the boldest, most original minds of our time was annealed.” —Maria Popova, BrainPickings

    “One of the more beautiful narratives I’ve read.” —Ezra Klein, Vox

    “Rebecca Solnit’s opposition to injustice in its many forms, and her relentless inquiry as a writer and reporter into a great range of issues—racial injustice, nuclear weapons, indigenous rights, male hegemony—have defined the outrage and politics of much of her generation. In Recollections of My Nonexistence she draws all these potent metaphors for inequity together into a moral stance that transcends the particulars of all her topics. This is a remarkable book—smart, brave, edgy, insightful, and authentic.” —Barry Lopez

    “One of our foremost thinkers on womanhood explores the journey of her becoming in this deeply personal memoir about her youth in San Francisco. In her searing, sensitive voice, Solnit recalls the epidemic of violence against women . . . tracing her journey as a writer through her journey to speak out on behalf of women.” Esquire

    “Activist and essayist Rebecca Solnit has long captured the discomforts and difficulties of modern womanhood . . . [I]n describing [her youth], she details how she found her voice as an advocate for herself and those around her.” Time

    “Fantastic . . . Solnit generously offers the story of finding her voice – exemplary as it is – as just one of the tales 'waiting to be told' in feminism’s twenty-first century.” BUST

    “This powerful memoir reveals how Solnit’s coming-of-age as a journalist and a woman in 1980s San Francisco shaped her as a writer and a feminist. She grapples with sexual harassment, poverty, trauma, and women’s exclusion from the cultural conversation, while discovering punk rock and the LGBTQ+ community as safe havens. Her words have long empowered people who feel voiceless, and her latest book is no exception.” Good Housekeeping

    “[Solnit] couches her own lived experience . . . within a larger exploration of contemporary womanhood and an unapologetically feminist, queer lens. While beautifully exercising her own literary voice, Solnit simultaneously poses the question: Who do we allow to characterize the female experience? And what needs to happen in order for that to change?”Parade

    “An inquisitive, perceptive, and original thinker and enthralling writer . . . Solnit has created an unconventional and galvanizing memoir-in-essays that shares key, often terrifying, formative moments in her valiant writing life . . . [and] illuminates with piercing lyricism the body-and-soul dangers women face in our complexly, violently misogynist world . . . [A]n incandescent addition to the literature of dissent and creativity.” —Booklist (starred)

    “While misogyny and its effect on women’s psyches is familiar territory for Solnit, as in her breakthrough 2014 essay collection, Men Explain Things To Me, here the prolific writer gets more personal than ever as she reflects upon her youth in 1980s San Francisco.” AV Club

    “Absorbing . . . A perceptive, radiant portrait of a writer of indelible consequence.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred) 

    “An engaging look at Solnit’s life, which succeeds in giving voice to inequity caused by patriarchy . . . Her recollection of her feelings regarding violence and being silenced are particularly resonant . . . She knows who she is and which forces have shaped her . . . [and] realizes the power of naming inequity, violence, and oppression against women.” Library Journal

    “Enlightening . . . a thinking person’s book about writing, female identity, and freedom by a powerful and motivating voice for change.” Publishers Weekly
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780593083345
    ISBN-10: 0593083342
    Publisher: Penguin Books
    Publication Date: March 9th, 2021
    Pages: 256
    Language: English
  • Deacon King Kong

    Deacon King Kong: A Novel Cover Image
    $17.00
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    March 2020 Indie Next List


    Deacon King Kong is a quintessential New York story. Set in the Brooklyn projects in 1969, a perpetually inebriated deacon called Sportcoat aims a gun at the neighborhood’s main drug dealer in the public plaza and pulls the trigger. Incredibly well-constructed and hilarious at times, McBride’s story entwines a number of storylines that are kickstarted by this central event. The local Italian gangster, the veteran cop, the meddling churchgoers, and the drug pushers all have their own agendas, hopes, and dreams that are affected. And though Sportcoat doesn’t remember his actions and is always under the influence of gut-rot moonshine, I couldn’t help but root for him as I was reading this. His delightful ineptitude and absence of clarity made this book impossible for me to put down. If you’ve never read McBride before, this is a great introduction.”
    — Stuart McCommon, Novel., Memphis, TN

    Description


    Winner of the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Fiction
     
    Winner of the Gotham Book Prize

    One of Barack Obama's "Favorite Books of the Year"

    Oprah's Book Club Pick

    Named one of the Top Ten Books of the Year by the New York Times, Entertainment Weekly and TIME Magazine

    Washington Post Notable Novel

    From the author of the National Book Award–winning The Good Lord Bird and the bestselling modern classic The Color of Water, comes one of the most celebrated novels of the year.


    In September 1969, a fumbling, cranky old church deacon known as Sportcoat shuffles into the courtyard of the Cause Houses housing project in south Brooklyn, pulls a .38 from his pocket, and, in front of everybody, shoots the project’s drug dealer at point-blank range.

    The reasons for this desperate burst of violence and the consequences that spring from it lie at the heart of Deacon King Kong, James McBride’s funny, moving novel and his first since his National Book Award–winning The Good Lord Bird. In Deacon King Kong, McBride brings to vivid life the people affected by the shooting: the victim, the African-American and Latinx residents who witnessed it, the white neighbors, the local cops assigned to investigate, the members of the Five Ends Baptist Church where Sportcoat was deacon, the neighborhood’s Italian mobsters, and Sportcoat himself.

    As the story deepens, it becomes clear that the lives of the characters—caught in the tumultuous swirl of 1960s New York—overlap in unexpected ways. When the truth does emerge, McBride shows us that not all secrets are meant to be hidden, that the best way to grow is to face change without fear, and that the seeds of love lie in hope and compassion.

    Bringing to these pages both his masterly storytelling skills and his abiding faith in humanity, James McBride has written a novel every bit as involving as The Good Lord Bird and as emotionally honest as The Color of Water. Told with insight and wit, Deacon King Kong demonstrates that love and faith live in all of us.


    About the Author


    James McBride is an accomplished musician and the author of the National Book Awardwinning novel The Good Lord Bird, the bestselling American classic The Color of Water, the novels Song Yet Sung and Miracle at St. Anna, the story collection Five-Carat Soul, and Kill ’Em and Leave, a biography of James Brown. The recipient of a National Humanities Medal, McBride is also a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University.

    Praise For…


    Praise for DEACON KING KONG:
     
    “A mystery story, a crime novel, an urban farce, a sociological portrait of late-1960s Brooklyn: McBride’s novel contains multitudes… He conducts his antic symphony with deep feeling, never losing sight of the suffering and inequity within the merriment.” The New York Times, Top 10 Books of 2020
     
    "Shouldn’t we just get it over with and declare McBride this decade’s Great American Novelist?...McBride has a way of inflating reality to comical sizes, the better for us to see every tiny mechanism that holds unjust systems in place." Los Angeles Times
     
    “A raucous, poignant, humanity-embracing novel.” O, The Oprah Magazine, Top 20 Books of 2020
     
    “A story of comedy and compassion.” TIME, Top 10 Books of 2020
     
    “A boisterous, imaginative, tender foray into late- 1960’s Brooklyn.” Entertainment Weekly, Top 10 Books of 2020
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780735216730
    ISBN-10: 0735216738
    Publisher: Riverhead Books
    Publication Date: February 2nd, 2021
    Pages: 400
    Language: English
  • Black Brother, Black Brother

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    Black Brother, Black Brother Cover Image
    $7.99
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    Staff Reviews


     

     

    — From Black Brother, Black Brother

    Spring 2020 Kids Indie Next List


    “In Black Brother, Black Brother, Rhodes looks at colorism, prejudice in schooling systems against people of color, and whitewashing in history all in a brilliant sports narrative. After being falsely accused of disrupting class at his private school and then arrested for being angry that no one would listen to him, Donte is encouraged to get back at his bully in their own game: fencing. What follows is a book filled with brilliance, familial love, and friendship. I love this book and look forward to recommending it to everyone!”
    — Nathaniel Hattrick, Liberty Bay Books, Poulsbo, WA

    Description


    From award-winning and bestselling author Jewell Parker Rhodes comes a powerful coming-of-age story about two brothers, one who presents as white, the other as black, and the complex ways in which they are forced to navigate the world, all while training for a fencing competition -- now in paperback!
    Framed. Bullied. Disliked. But I know I can still be the best.

    Sometimes, 12-year-old Donte wishes he were invisible. As one of the few black boys at Middlefield Prep, most of the students don't look like him. They don't like him either. Dubbing him "Black Brother," Donte's teachers and classmates make it clear they wish he were more like his lighter-skinned brother, Trey.

    When he's bullied and framed by the captain of the fencing team, "King" Alan, he's suspended from school and arrested for something he didn't do.

    Terrified, searching for a place where he belongs, Donte joins a local youth center and meets former Olympic fencer Arden Jones. With Arden's help, he begins training as a competitive fencer, setting his sights on taking down the fencing team captain, no matter what.

    As Donte hones his fencing skills and grows closer to achieving his goal, he learns the fight for justice is far from over. Now Donte must confront his bullies, racism, and the corrupt systems of power that led to his arrest.

    Powerful and emotionally gripping, Black Brother, Black Brother is a careful examination of the school-to-prison pipeline and follows one boy's fight against racism and his empowering path to finding his voice.

    About the Author


    Jewell Parker Rhodes is the author of Ninth Ward, winner of a Coretta Scott King Honor, Sugar, winner of the Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and the New York Times-bestselling Ghost Boys, and Black Brother, Black Brother. She has also written many award-winning novels for adults. When she's not writing, Jewell visits schools to talk about her books and teaches writing at Arizona State University.


    Praise For…


    Praise for Black Brother, Black Brother

    *"A powerful work and must-have for children's collections."—Booklist, starred review

    "Placing biracial boyhood and the struggles of colorism at its center, the novel challenges readers to pursue their own self-definition."—Kirkus

    *"An excellent selection for both elementary and middle library collections, this is a title that celebrates finding one's place in the world."—School Library Connection, starred review

    "Donte's story is a good primer for younger readers on microaggressions."—School Library Journal

    "A classic sports story."—BCCB

    "This novel offers a solid story, with relatable, three-dimensional characters considering identity, that will teach readers about colorism's effects."
    Publishers Weekly
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780316493796
    ISBN-10: 0316493791
    Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
    Publication Date: March 30th, 2021
    Pages: 272
    Language: English
  • Becoming - Adapted for Young Readers

    Becoming: Adapted for Young Readers Cover Image
    $18.99
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    Description


    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Michelle Obama’s worldwide bestselling memoir, Becoming, is now adapted for young readers.

    Michelle Robinson was born on the South Side of Chicago. From her modest beginnings, she would become Michelle Obama, the inspiring and powerful First Lady of the United States, when her husband, Barack Obama, was elected the forty-fourth president. They would be the first Black First Family in the White House and serve the country for two terms.
     
    Growing up, Michelle and her older brother, Craig, shared a bedroom in their family’s upstairs apartment in her great-aunt’s house. Her parents, Fraser and Marian, poured their love and energy into their children. Michelle’s beloved dad taught his kids to work hard, keep their word, and remember to laugh. Her mom showed them how to think for themselves, use their voice, and be unafraid.
     
    But life soon took her far from home. With determination, carefully made plans, and the desire to achieve, Michelle was eager to expand the sphere of her life from her schooling in Chicago. She went to Princeton University, where she learned what it felt like to be the only Black woman in the room. She then went to Harvard Law School, and after graduating returned to Chicago and became a high-powered lawyer. Her plans changed, however, when she met and fell in love with Barack Obama.
     
    From her early years of marriage, and the struggle to balance being a working woman, a wife, and the mom of two daughters, Michelle Obama details the shift she made to political life and what her family endured as a result of her husband’s fast-moving political career and campaign for the presidency. She shares the glamour of ball gowns and world travel, and the difficulties of comforting families after tragedies. She managed to be there for her daughters’ swim competitions and attend plays at their schools without catching the spotlight, while defining and championing numerous initiatives, especially those geared toward kids, during her time as First Lady.
     
    Most important, this volume for young people is an honest and fascinating account of Michelle Obama’s life led by example. She shares her views on how all young people can help themselves as well as help others, no matter their status in life. She asks readers to realize that no one is perfect, and that the process of becoming is what matters, as finding yourself is ever evolving. In telling her story with boldness, she asks young readers: Who are you, and what do you want to become?

    About the Author


    Michelle Robinson Obama served as First Lady of the United States from 2009 to 2017. A graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Law School, Mrs. Obama started her career as an attorney at the Chicago law firm Sidley & Austin, where she met her future husband, Barack Obama. She later worked in the Chicago mayor’s office, at the University of Chicago, and at the University of Chicago Medical Center. Mrs. Obama also founded the Chicago chapter of Public Allies, an organization that prepares young people for careers in public service.
     
    The Obamas currently live in Washington, D.C., and have two daughters, Malia and Sasha.
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780593303740
    ISBN-10: 0593303741
    Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
    Publication Date: March 2nd, 2021
    Pages: 432
    Language: English
  • What It's Like to Be a Bird

    What It's Like to Be a Bird: From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing--What Birds Are Doing, and Why (Sibley Guides) Cover Image
    $35.00
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    Description


    The bird book for birders and nonbirders alike that will excite and inspire by providing a new and deeper understanding of what common, mostly backyard, birds are doing—and why

    "Can birds smell?"; "Is this the same cardinal that was at my feeder last year?"; "Do robins 'hear' worms?"

    In What It's Like to Be a Bird, David Sibley answers the most frequently asked questions about the birds we see most often. This special, large-format volume is geared as much to nonbirders as it is to the out-and-out obsessed, covering more than two hundred species and including more than 330 new illustrations by the author. While its focus is on familiar backyard birds—blue jays, nuthatches, chickadees—it also examines certain species that can be fairly easily observed, such as the seashore-dwelling Atlantic puffin.

    David Sibley's exacting artwork and wide-ranging expertise bring observed behaviors vividly to life. (For most species, the primary illustration is reproduced life-sized.) And while the text is aimed at adults—including fascinating new scientific research on the myriad ways birds have adapted to environmental changes—it is nontechnical, making it the perfect occasion for parents and grandparents to share their love of birds with young children, who will delight in the big, full-color illustrations of birds in action.

    Unlike any other book he has written, What It's Like to Be a Bird is poised to bring a whole new audience to David Sibley's world of birds.

    About the Author


    DAVID ALLEN SIBLEY is the author and illustrator of the series of successful guides to nature that bear his name, including The Sibley Guide to Birds. He has contributed to Smithsonian, Science, The Wilson Journal of Ornithology, Birding, BirdWatching, North American Birds, and The New York Times. He is a recipient of the Roger Tory Peterson Award for Promoting the Cause of Birding from the American Birding Association and the Linnaean Society of New York's Eisenmann Medal. He lives and birds in Massachusetts.

    Praise For…


    "Lingering over every page of What It's Like to Be a Bird, this is what can be seen: The book's beauty mirrors the beauty of birds it describes so marvelously." —NPR

    "Any new Sibley book is an event . . . A sprightly, information-packed encyclopedia of bird behavior. What lifts it into the realm of art is Sibley’s illustrations—330 of them, many life-size. Captured in pencil and gouache, Sibley’s birds are as scientifically accurate as Peterson’s or Audubon’s, but less static, more alive . . . The American robin with a rust-red Dickensian waistcoat; a martial, copper-feathered red-tailed hawk perched watchful along a country road—these and all the birds celebrated in What It’s Like to Be a Bird seem ready to take flight." —Peter Fish, San Francisco Chronicle

    "An afternoon with this sprawling volume on my lap was a lovely way to tolerate a day of social distancing . . . What It’s Like to Be a Bird gives Sibley’s artwork ample room to spread its wings . . . In a spring shadowed by the darker mysteries of nature, Sibley’s book is a welcome occasion to connect with the more pleasing puzzle of what our feathered friends are up to." —Danny Heitman, The Christian Science Monitor

    "After years of rushing to his indispensable field guides for sure resolution of any bird or tree ID conundrum, I’m delighted to find David Allen Sibley stretching his considerable artistic and literary wings . . . Having painted them all in every possible plumage permutation, evenly lighted and in profile, Mr. Sibley’s joy in creating chiaroscuro tableaux of birds feeding, flying and tending their young is palpable . . . Expect to be surprised at the mental and physical capabilities of birds." —Julie Zickefoose, The Wall Street Journal

    "Simply gorgeous . . . Appropriate for general readers as well as bird experts, and it is perfectly suitable for young readers . . . As the world’s bird population shrinks, it is helpful and even inspiring to learn as much as possible about the amazing feathered creatures that share our planet. There is no better way than to browse through David Allen Sibley’s new book, What It’s Like to Be a Bird." —Nancy Gilson, The Columbus Dispatch

    "You'll want to linger on each page to enjoy Sibley's illustrations . . . If you love birds, you'll love this book." —Jennifer J. Meyer, The Backyard Birder

    "Sibley answers all kinds of questions people have about birds . . . [His] exacting artwork and wide-ranging expertise bring observed behaviors vividly to life." —Birdwatching

    "Gorgeous art and fascinating information come together here. The organization makes it easy to pick up and read whatever strikes your fancy, while the depth of information means that anyone can learn a great deal. And then there’s the art—lots and lots of it. All that makes this book attractive to anyone even remotely interested in birds." —The Birder's Library

    "A fascinating work that fulfills its goal to 'give readers some sense of what it’s like to be a bird' . . . [Readers] will emerge with a deeper appreciation of birds, and of what observable behaviors can reveal about animals’ lives." Publishers Weekly

    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780307957894
    ISBN-10: 0307957896
    Publisher: Knopf
    Publication Date: April 14th, 2020
    Pages: 240
    Language: English
    Series: Sibley Guides
  • Oudolf Hummelo

    Staff Pick Badge
    Hummelo: A Journey Through a Plantsman's Life Cover Image
    $40.00
    Most titles are on our shelves or available within 1-5 days.

    Description


    An intimate look at the personal garden of the Dutch landscape designer renowned for his plantings at the High Line in New York City, and Lurie Garden at Chicago’s Millennium Park.

    Hummelo—near the village of the same name in Gelderland in the eastern Netherlands—is visited by thousands of gardeners seeking inspiration each year. It is Piet Oudolf’s home, his personal garden laboratory, a former nursery run by his wife Anja, and the place where he first tested new designs and created the new varieties of perennials that are now widely available.

    A follow-up to Oudolf’s successful Landscapes in LandscapesHummelo tells the story of how the garden has evolved over the past three decades since Oudolf, Anja, and their two young sons moved onto the property, with its loamy sand and derelict, wood stove-heated farmhouse, in 1982. Text by noted garden author and longtime personal friend Noel Kingsbury places Hummelo in context within gardening history, from The Netherlands’ counterculture and nascent green movement of the 1960s, to prairie restoration in the American Midwest, and shows how its development has mirrored that of Oudolf’s own outstanding career and unique naturalistic aesthetic.

    Oudolf has long been at the forefront of the Dutch Wave and New Perennial Style movements in garden design, which have ecological considerations at their base. His work stresses a deep knowledge of plants, eschewing short-lived annuals in favor of perennials that can be appreciated for both structure and blooms in every season. He is credited for leading the way to today’s focus on sustainability in garden design.

    The book will appeal to readers who favor beautiful, biodiverse, and ever-changing plantings: seed heads, grasses, sedges, and winter silhouettes. They will be drawn into its pages by lush photography, often demonstrating how Oudolf views his own work, and providing rare glimpses into his daily life. Short essays highlight important techniques, including scatter plants and matrix planting, and introduce other famed landscape designers—Karl Foerster, Henk Gerritsen, Rob Leopold, Ernst Pagels, and Mien Ruys—to create a full panorama of the movement Oudolf now leads.

    About the Author


    Piet Oudolf is an influential Dutch garden and landscape designer at the forefront of the New Perennial movement and the author of numerous books on gardening and landscape design. He has constructed dozens of residential, commercial and institutional gardens and his projects can be found throughout The Netherlands, England, Ireland, Germany, Sweden and the U.S.—including the celebrated High Line and Battery Park in New York City, Lurie Garden at Millennium Park in Chicago, and temporary installations for the Venice Biennale and the Serpentine Gallery pavilion. He is the recipient of the Gold Medal and title of Best in Show at the Chelsea Flower Show (2000), the Gold Veitch Memorial Medal from the Royal Horticultural Society (2002) and the Award of Distinction from the Association of Professional Landscape Designers in 2010. He was awarded the highest cultural honor in The Netherlands, the Prince Bernhard Culture prize, in 2013.
     
    Noel Kingsbury is an internationally acclaimed garden writer and the author of more than 20 books (including several with Oudolf), as well as a teacher, lecturer, and garden designer. He is a regular contributor to The Daily Telegraph, The Guardian, The Garden, and Hortus, among other publications.

    Praise For…


    A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year

    “An updated version of the original . . . reflects important new commissions and directions for Oudolf.”
    —The Washington Post

    “Even if you already have the original of this book, you'll want to consider this new, expanded paperback version that includes 13 recent projects shown here for the first time, along with Piet Oudolf's new strategies for design and plant selection. . . . With 350 photographs, the book is an encyclopedia of Oudolf's planting style and his philosophy of looking to the natural world for inspiration.”
    —Garden Design Online

    “To mark his 70th birthday, Piet Oudolf, the Dutch prince of a new, highly artistic style of planting, produced a handsome, lavishly photographed book, Hummelo: A Journey Through a Plantsman’s Life, a gift to all serious lovers of garden design. His farmhouse in Hummelo, a village in the eastern Netherlands, was the modest beginning of a nursery that eventually drew customers from around the world. Written by his frequent collaborator, Noel Kingsbury—they also worked together on the indispensable Planting: A New PerspectiveHummelo isn’t a biography, but it does explain how the man who devised New York City’s Battery and High Line gardens and Chicago’s Lurie Garden did 'so much to raise the profile of landscape designers as a group.' It also sketches a fascinating history of modern Dutch gardening, largely unknown in the United States. If we truly want to heal the land, this important work is a model. And, in their adventurous, arresting, multilayered density, Oudolf’s compositions are stunningly beautiful.” 
    —The New York Times Book Review

    “Written to commemorate Piet Oudolf’s 70th birthday, Hummelo: A Journey Through a Plantsman’s Life recounts his path from a small-garden designer in the Netherlands to a world-renowned plantsman, best known for his breathtaking perennial landscapes. But it is not a biography, stresses the author, Noel Kingsbury. It is a story of the evolution of Oudolf’s work, beginning with his garden near the village of Hummelo, and tracing the fluctuating design processes that Oudolf himself believes should be dismantled once learned. The book is organized chronologically, opening with Oudolf’s move from Haarlem, near Amsterdam, to a plot just outside Hummelo, where Oudolf settled with his family for “growing space” and eventually a nursery for the perennial material that wasn’t readily available in the area. It then follows his growing success in Europe before his break in the United States with Chicago’s Lurie Garden and eventually the High Line in New York City. Accompanying Kingsbury’s text are many photographs taken at differing scales, seasons, and stages of completion, highlighting the level of detail Oudolf invests in his landscapes. In addition to photographs, the book features noteworthy practices of Oudolf’s, including planting arrangements and techniques, which are broken down into clear explanations of their historical context and development. While his planting designs have evolved over the 30-some years covered in Hummelo, a glance at any page reveals the beauty and composition that are recognizably Oudolf’s.”
    —Landscape Architecture

    “To celebrate the 70th birthday of Dutch plantsman Piet Oudolf—whose romantic drifts of painterly grasses and perennials have made him the most copied landscape designer alive—The Monacelli Press is publishing a new book about his private garden. When garden designer Oudolf and his wife Anja moved with their two young sons to an eastern Netherlands farmhouse on a one-acre plot in 1982, there was no garden and no nursery where he could grow plants for his business. 'We had money to survive one year,' remembers Oudolf. 'And at first we had no clients.' And no heat in the house except a wood stove. In Hummelo, British garden writer Noel Kingsbury tells the story of how Oudolf and his wife managed, with hard work and her cut-flower business, to gradually create a garden that embodied the ideas of today's New Perennials movement. Along the way, Hummelo became so famous in its own right that the Oudolfs might wake up on any given day to find strangers tromping about (after the garden's much-photographed yew hedges died in 2010, some tourists from Brussels were so shocked and disappointed that without another word 'they got in their car and drove away,' Oudolf says).”
    —Gardenista

    “Illuminates the garden philosophy which led to the seemingly wild, native-plants-style creation of meadows and flowering plants which have riveted us all. The pictures, most of them by Oudolf, are evocative.”
    —Women's Wear Daily

    “Hummelo, is something of a biography, or as close to one as Oudolf would allow. Despite being such a well-known figure in the garden world, he is a self-contained fellow. Bringing the story back to this plot of land, reflecting the evolution and changes in both Oudolf’s life and career, reinforces just how much he is a true plantsman, someone who delights in the variations and possibilities of propagating and growing.” 
    —Kaufmann Mercantile's “Field Notes” 
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9781580935708
    ISBN-10: 1580935702
    Publisher: The Monacelli Press
    Publication Date: March 9th, 2021
    Pages: 416
    Language: English
  • The Kitchen Without Borders

    The Kitchen without Borders: Recipes and Stories from Refugee and Immigrant Chefs Cover Image
    $24.95
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    Description


    Refugees by status, chefs by calling.

    The Kitchen Without Borders is a special kind of cookbook. In it, chefs from around the world – all part of Eat Offbeat, a catering company staffed by immigrants and refugees who have found a new home and new hope through cooking- offer up to 70 authentic, surprising, nourishing recipes. The food has roots that run as deep as its flavors, celebrating the culinary traditions of Syria, Iran, Eritrea, Venezuela, and more. Discover Iraqi Biryani, a rice dish combining vegetables and plump dried fruits with warming spices. Chari Bari, hand formed meatballs simmered in Nepali- spiced tomato and cashew sauce. Iranian rice with garbanzos, Sri Lankan curry dhal, and Manchurian cauliflower straight from the Himalayas. More than a collection of delicious foods from around the world, this inspiring cookbook- with its intimate chef profiles and photographic portraits-offers a glimpse into the journey of displaced people and highlights the profound link between food and home.

    *From March 1, 2021, to March 1, 2022, (including any preordered copies that ship during this period), Workman Publishing will donate 2% of the cover price for every copy of The Kitchen without Borders cookbook sold in the United States and its territories, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and European Union member states, to the IRC, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to providing humanitarian aid, relief and resettlement to refugees and other victims of oppression, conflict, or disaster with a minimum contribution of $25,000 USD. For more information, visit rescue.org/cookbook and https://www.workman.com/kwob. No portion of the purchase price is tax-deductible. For additional information about the IRC, see rescue.org.


     

    About the Author


    Eat Offbeat is a catering company in New York that features new, off-the-beaten-path cuisines and creates quality jobs for refugee and minority immigrant home cooks. Eat Offbeat, which was founded by Manal Kahi and Wissam Kahi in November 2015, has been featured in major media outlets in the US and abroad, including The Guardian, Fast Company, Forbes, Newsweek, the Huffington Post, and CBS News. 

    Praise For…


    New horizons open in 'The Kitchen Without Borders,'... It’s home-cooking at its best." – The New York Times

    “[A] delightful collection of 70 flavor-packed recipes… informative and engaging, this volume is sure to inspire home cooks.” Publishers Weekly

    "With such rich variety, this collection of recipes is sure to provide both familiar and novel delights to any reader."  Booklist

    "Family recipes are more than just food—each of the dishes collected in The Kitchen without Borders: Recipes and Stories from Refugee and Immigrant Chefs comes from someone's beautiful memory of home. With bold flavors—from Syrian pomegranate molasses to spice blends like Venezuelan achiote to insanely spicy Scotch bonnet peppers—this is food for both the body and soul."  Newsweek  
     
    Product Details
    ISBN: 9781523504046
    ISBN-10: 1523504048
    Publisher: Workman Publishing Company
    Publication Date: March 2nd, 2021
    Pages: 232
    Language: English
  • Another Brooklyn

    Staff Pick Badge
    Another Brooklyn: A Novel Cover Image
    $22.99
    Most titles are on our shelves or available within 1-5 days.

    Staff Reviews


    From the award-winning author of Brown Girl Dreaming, a beautifully rendered coming of age story that reads like a prose poem. From the warm rural South to chilly Brooklyn, August finds her way through the death of her mother and on to discover the value of friendship and intellectual pursuits. Marvelous!

    Marion

    — From Another Brooklyn

    August 2016 Indie Next List


    “National Book Award-winning author Jacqueline Woodson has crafted a beautiful, heart-wrenching novel of a young girl's coming-of-age in Brooklyn. Effortlessly weaving poetic prose, Woodson tells the story of the relationships young women form, their yearning to belong, and the bonds that are created - and broken. Brooklyn itself is a vivid character in this tale -- a place at first harsh, but one that becomes home and plays a role in each character's future. Woodson is one of the most skilled storytellers of our day, and I continue to love and devour each masterpiece she creates!”
    — Nicole Yasinsky (E), The Booksellers at Laurelwood, Memphis, TN

    Description


    A Finalist for the 2016 National Book Award

    New York Times Bestseller

    A SeattleTimes pick for Summer Reading Roundup 2017

    The acclaimed New York Times bestselling and National Book Award–winning author of Brown Girl Dreaming delivers her first adult novel in twenty years.

    Running into a long-ago friend sets memory from the 1970s in motion for August, transporting her to a time and a place where friendship was everything—until it wasn’t. For August and her girls, sharing confidences as they ambled through neighborhood streets, Brooklyn was a place where they believed that they were beautiful, talented, brilliant—a part of a future that belonged to them.

    But beneath the hopeful veneer, there was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place where grown men reached for innocent girls in dark hallways, where ghosts haunted the night, where mothers disappeared. A world where madness was just a sunset away and fathers found hope in religion.

    Like Louise Meriwether’s Daddy Was a Number Runner and Dorothy Allison’s Bastard Out of Carolina, Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn heartbreakingly illuminates the formative time when childhood gives way to adulthood—the promise and peril of growing up—and exquisitely renders a powerful, indelible, and fleeting friendship that united four young lives.

    About the Author


    Jacqueline Woodson is the 2014 National Book Award Winner for her New York Times bestselling memoir Brown Girl Dreaming, which was also a recipient of the Coretta Scott King Award, a Newbery Honor Award, the NAACP Image Award, and the Sibert Honor Award. She is also the author of New York Times bestselling novel Another Brooklyn (Harper/Amistad), which was a 2016 National Book Award Finalist and Woodson’s first adult novel in twenty years. In 2015, Woodson was named Young People’s Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation. She is the author of more than two dozen award-winning books for young adults, middle graders, and children; among her many accolades, she is a four-time Newbery Honor winner, a three-time National Book Award finalist, and a two-time Coretta Scott King Award winner.


    http://www.jacquelinewoodson.com/

    Praise For…


    “Woodson’s unsparing story of a girl becoming a woman recalls some of the genre’s all-time greats: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, The Bluest Eye and especially, with its darkly poetic language, The House on Mango Street.
    — Sarah Begley, Time

    “An engrossing novel about friendship, race, the magic of place and the relentlessness of change.”
    People Magazine

    “Woodson manages to remember what cannot be documented, to suggest what cannot be said. Another Brooklyn is another name for poetry.”
    Washington Post

    “Woodson does for young black girls what short story master Alice Munroe does for poor rural ones: She imbues their everyday lives with significance.”
    Elle

    “In Jacqueline Woodson’s soaring choral poem of a novel…four young friends…navigate the perils of adolescence, mean streets, and haunted memory in 1970s Brooklyn, all while dreaming of escape.”
    Vanity Fair

    Another Brooklyn joins the tradition of studying female friendships and the families we create when our own isn’t enough, like that of Toni Morrison’s Sula, Tayari Jones’ Silver Sparrow and Zami: A New Spelling of My Name by Audre Lorde. Woodson uses her expertise at portraying the lives of children to explore the power of memory, death and friendship.
    Los Angeles Times Book Review

    “…it is the personal encounters that form the gorgeous center of this intense, moving novel...Structured as short vignettes, each reading more like prose poetry than traditional narrative, the novel unfolds as memory does, in burning flashes, thick with detail...”
    New York Times Book Review

    “With Another Brooklyn, Jacqueline Woodson has delivered a love letter to loss, girlhood, and home. It is a lyrical, haunting exploration of family, memory, and other ties that bind us to one another and the world.”
    Boston Globe

    “Woodson writes lyrically about what it means to be a girl in America, and what it means to be black in America. Each sentence is taut with potential energy, but the story never bursts into tragic flames; it stays strong and subtle throughout.”
    Huffington Post

    “Gorgeously written and moving, Another Brooklyn is an examination of the complexities of youth and adolescence, loss, friendship, family, race, and religion.”
    — Jarry Lee, Buzzfeed

    “[E]ntwined coming-of-age narratives-lost mothers, wounded war vets, nodding junkies, menacing streetscapes-are starkly realistic, yet brim with moments of pure poetry.”
    Elle Books Feature

    “…fine-cadenced prose…”
    Wall Street Journal

    “The novel’s richness defies its slim page count. In her poet’s prose, Woodson not only shows us backward-glancing August attempting to stave off growing up and the pains that betray youth, she also wonders how we dream of a life parallel to the one we’re living.”
    — Booklist (Starred Review)

    Another Brooklyn reads like a love song to girlhood…”
    — Bustle

    “emotionally resonant work”
    Seattle Times

    “Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn is a gauzy, lyrical fever dream of a book.”
    Vox Magazine

    “There are nothrowaway sentences in Another Brooklyn — each short, poetic line feels carefully loved and polished. The first half of this novel asks urgent questions; the second delivers uneasy, heartbreaking answers. At its core, this book is about fragility, how light shines in the broken places.”
    — Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards

    “Jacqueline Woodson is a gorgeous writer…lyrical prose, really, really beautiful.”
    — Emma Straub, New York Times Bestselling author of Modern Lovers and The Vacationers

    ‘’…And Sister Jacqueline Woodson comes singing memory. Her words like summer lightning get caught in my throat and I draw her up from southern roots to a Brooklyn of a thousand names, where she and her three ‘sisters’ learn to navigate a new season. A new herstory. Everywhere I turn, my dear Sister Jacqueline, I hear your words, a wild sea pausing in the wind. And I sing…”
    — Sister Sonia Sanchez

    “Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn is another kind of book, another kind of beautiful, a lyrical, hallucinatory, heartbreaking, and powerful novel. Every gorgeous page leads to another revelation, another poignant event or memory. This is an incredible and memorable book.”
    — Edwidge Danticat, author of Claire of the Sea Light

    “Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn is another kind of book, another kind of beautiful, a lyrical, hallucinatory, heartbreaking, and powerful novel. Every gorgeous page leads to another revelation, another poignant event or memory. This is an incredible and memorable book.”
    — Ann Patchett, New York Times Bestselling Author of This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage and State of Wonder

    “In this elegant and moving novel, Jacqueline Woodson explores the beauty and burden of growing up girl in 1970’s Brooklyn through the lens of one unforgettable narrator. The guarded hopes and whispered fears that August and her girlfriends share left me thinking about the limits and rewards of friendship well after the novel’s end. Full of moments of grief, grace, and wonder, Another Brooklyn proves that Jacqueline Woodson is a master storyteller.”
    — Angela Flournoy, author of The Turner House, a finalist for the National Book Award

    “Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn is a wonder. With a poet’s soul and a poet’s eye for image and ear for lyrical language, Woodson delivers a moving meditation on girlhood, love, loss, hurt, friendship, family, faith, longing, and desire. This novel is a love letter to a place, an era, and a group of young women that we’ve never seen depicted quite this way or this tenderly. Woodson has created an unforgettable, entrancing narrator in August. I’ll go anywhere she leads me.”
    — Naomi Jackson, author of The Star Side of Bird Hill

    “Jacqueline Woodson’s spare, emphatic novel about young women growing up in 1970s Bushwick brings some of our deepest silences-about danger, loss, and black girls’ coming of age-into powerful lyric speech. Another Brooklyn is heartbreaking and restorative, a gorgeous and generous paean to all we must leave behind on the path to becoming ourselves.”
    — Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize-Winning author of Life on Mars and Ordinary Light

    “A stunning achievement from one of the quietly great masters of our time.”
    Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

    “Woodson…combines grit and beauty in a series of stunning vignettes, painting a vivid mural of what it was like to grow up African-American in Brooklyn during the 1970s…Woodson draws on all the senses to trace the milestones in a woman’s life and how her early experiences shaped her identity.”
    Publishers Weekly, (Boxed and Starred Review)

    “With spare yet poetic writing, this long-awaited adult novel by National Book Award winner Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming) is a series of vignettes narrated by August, shortly after her dad’s funeral and a chance encounter with an old friend.”
    Library Journal (starred review)

    “Perhaps unsurprisingly, given Woodson’s background not only as a novelist but also as a poet, Another Brooklyn is told in spare, lyrical prose, with a surface simplicity that belies its underlying narrative strength and emotional heft. Often, in Woodson’s novel, what isn’t said is as essential as what is, and readers come away feeling as if they, in the process of reading the novel, are somehow partners in Woodson’s project of telling her poignant and devastating story about dreams deferred, destroyed, and—in rare cases—realized.”
    — BookBrowser Review


    Coverage from NPR

    Product Details
    ISBN: 9780062359988
    ISBN-10: 0062359983
    Publisher: Amistad
    Publication Date: August 9th, 2016
    Pages: 192
    Language: English

Pages